Quotations and re-use of texts in Sanskrit śāstras

Rome, the 21st-22nd December 2012

Convenor: Elisa Freschi


Provisional programme:

Friday the 21st December 2012

Introductory session (9–10)
  • h 9.00–9.10 A few methodological words by Elisa Freschi
  • h 9.10–10.00 Paradigm cases of analysis of quotations: Himal Trikha

Broadening the picture (10-12.45)
  • h 10.00–10.50 Intertextuality in Greek Historians (tbc) by Monica Berti
  • h 10.50–11.40 Re-use of formulas by the Vedic poets by Elena Mucciarelli
  • [CB h 11.40–11.55]
  • h 11.55–12.45 Re-use of texts as attested in marginal annotations by Camillo Formigatti

Focusing on śāstra (12.45–18.15)
  • h 12.45 Introduction on quotations in śāstra by Raffaele Torella
  • [Lunch: 13.30–14.30]
  • h 14.30–15.20 Re-use of texts among the commentaries of the Sāṅkhyakārikās by Kengo Harimoto
  • h 15.20–16.10 Quotations of grammatical and non-grammatical texts in Helārāja’s commentary on the Padakāṇḍa of Vākyapadīya by Vincenzo Vergiani
  • [CB h 16.10–16.25]
  • h 16.25–17.15 Types of quotations as connected to the types of siddhānta in the Nyāyamañjarī 6 by Alessandro Graheli
  • h 17.15–18.05 Quotations and (lost) commentaries in Advaita Vedānta by Ivan Andrijanic

Saturday the 22nd December 2012

Subfocus on the Buddhist context throughout ages and milieus (9–11.30)
  • h 9.00–9.50 Text re-use in early Tibetan epistemological treatises by Pascale Hugon
  • h 9.50–10.40 Commenting by quoting. The case of Manorathanandin's Pramāṇavārttikavr̥tti by Cristina Pecchia
  • h 10.40–11.30 The creative erudition of Chapaṭa Saddhammajotipāla, a 15th-century grammarian and philosopher from Burma by Aleix Ruiz-Falqués

[CB 11.30-11.50]

Religious texts (11.50–13.30)
  • h 11.50–12.40 To borrow or not to borrow? The case of "vaibhavīyanarasiṃhakalpa" within the scope of Pāñcarātra literature by Ewa Debicka-Borek
  • h 12.40–13.30 Thinking through quotations: the case of the Medieval Dharmanibandhas by Florinda De Simini

Final discussion (and lunch together)




Some Introductory Remarks (read them now, so that you will not be bored to death by me at the actual conference)

Why should one study quotations?

Textual-critical reasons:
• In order to achieve better text editions (e.g., one needs to know whether a quotation embedded in a later text is a reliable witness –this also depends on the general attitude towards the kind of text quoted).
• In order to restore lost or partially lost texts
Historical-critical reasons:
• In order to gain a better understanding of Indian texts and/within their history (e.g., does the lack of quotations of a certain author by later texts
mean that s/he was not influential?).
• In order to better evaluate the relation of Indian authors to other authors (whom do they quote more frequently? do they feel like naming revered
teachers, or do they rather name only adversaries?…).
• In order to better understand Indian habits of reading and writing/composing texts (did they quote even longer passages literally? did they quote ad
sensum? did they have a small library of texts behind their desk?).

In order to address these problems, I would like to focus on collecting and evaluating the following data:

• Forms of quotation/embedment.
• Marks of quotation.
• Frequence of unmarked quotations and their reasons.
• Function of quotations within a given text.

Form of quotations

Broadly, one can point to two possible ways of analysing the different kinds of re-uses of older materials:
1. From the point of view of the literality of the re-used textual material:
• Quotations (the content is the same, the form may be slightly modified)
• References (only the content is the same)
• Inter-language (ideas which are broadly common at a certain time and cannot be traced back to a certain author).
2. From the point of view of the explicitness of the re-use:
• Passages acknowledged as having been authored by someone else
• Passages silently embedded in one’s own text

Further details can be found in the following document. Ideally, it would be great if we could all answer the questions listed above and in the document and if the final discussion could contribute to draw some more general conclusion out of our case-studies.

Speakers:

Ivan Andrijanic (Zagreb), Quotations and (lost) commentaries in Advaita Vedānta


Ewa Debicka-Borek (Cracow): To borrow or not to borrow? The case of "vaibhavīyanarasiṃhakalpa" within the scope of Pāñcarātra literature (provisional title)
(in the attachments: short summary and complete article)




Florinda De Simini (Napoli/Torino), Thinking through quotations: the case of the Medieval Dharmanibandhas
Alessandro Graheli (Vienna), Types of quotations as connected to the types of siddhānta in the Nyāyamañjarī 6


Kengo Harimoto (Hamburg), Re-use of texts among the commentaries of the Sāṅkhyakārikās (title tbc)

Pascale Hugon (Vienna), Text re-use in early Tibetan epistemological treatises


Elena Mucciarelli (Tübingen), Re-use of formulas by the Vedic poets


Cristina Pecchia (Vienna), Commenting by quoting. The case of Manorathanandin’s Pramāṇavārttikavr̥tti
(in the attachments: a summary of C.Pecchia's paper and a pdf of the passages she will analyse)



Aleix Ruiz Falqués(Cambridge), The creative erudition of Chapaṭa Saddhammajotipāla, a 15th-century grammarian and philosopher from Burma


Raffaele Torella (Roma), Introduction on quotations in śāstra (tbc)

Himal Trikha(Vienna), Evaluation and classification of intertextual elements in a phi­lo­so­phi­cal Jaina Sanskrit work



Vincenzo Vergiani(Cambridge), Quotations of grammatical and non-grammatical texts in Helārāja’s
commentary on the Padakāṇḍa of Vākyapadīya.


to be confirmed:
Daniele Cuneo (Cambridge), Abusive quotations, denied authority and the strange case of Sanskrit aesthetic though